All about FEVER

This info is from Dr Sears webby and I thought it’s good to make some notes here for future reference.

WHAT TEMPERATURE CONSTITUTES A FEVER?
  • Normal temperature – 97 to 99 degrees (36 to 37.2 Celcius).
  • Low-grade fever – 99 to 100.9 degrees (37.3 to 38.3 Celcius).
  • Common fever – 101 to 103.5 degrees (38.4 to 39.7 Celcius).
  • High fever – any fever over 103.6 degrees (39.8 Celcius).
SHOULD I TREAT A LOW GRADE FEVER?

No. Low-grade fevers are helpful in fighting off infection. You should only treat a fever when it is making your child miserable. Treat your child, not the fever.

TOP THREE CAUSES
  • Viral infection – this is the most common cause of fever in children. Examples are: Roseola, Colds, Flu, Coxsackie (hand, foot and mouth disease), Chicken Pox, Fifth Disease, and many others. Most viruses are not dangerous. They simply need to run their course over several days. They are not treatable with antibiotics.
  • Bacterial infection – Some examples include ear infection, sinus infection, pneumonia, bladder infection, and strep throat. These are treatable with antibiotics, although treatment can usually wait 12 hours until you can contact you doctor in the morning.
  • Teething– this can cause fevers, though usually not higher than 101.

What temperature warrants immediate attention?

  • Remember, fevers are your body’s natural response to infection, and not necessarily a sign that something serious is taking place.
  • Low-grade fevers are generally not serious, are easily treated, and can wait until the morning to be evaluated by your doctor.
  • Fevers of 101 to 103 (38.4 to 39.5 Celcius) are also generally not serious and can wait until morning to be evaluated, except as indicated below.
  • High fevers of 104 (40 Celcius) or higher that quickly come down to 100 or 101 (37.8 to 38.3 Celcius) with the treatment measures below are also generally not serious and can wait until morning, except as indicated below.

DANGER:

  • If your infant is 6 weeks or younger, and has a fever of 101 or higher, this is considered a medical emergency. Your doctor should evaluate your infant right away, either during business hours, or in an emergency room after hours. Do not give any fever-reducing medications in this situation (you don’t want to hide the fever until after a doctor has evaluated your baby). Be sure to confirm any fevers with a rectal thermometer (if available) before contacting your doctor.
  • Infants age 7 weeks to three months with a fever over 101 warrant an appointment with your doctor within the next several hours. You generally don’t need to page your doctor in the middle of the night in this situation if the office opens within the next few hours. Simply follow our recommendations on treating fever below and call your doctor in the morning. If it is the early evening you should probably page your doctor, since the office won’t be open until the following day. Be sure to confirm any fevers with a rectal thermometer (if available) before contacting your doctor.
  • ABOVE ALL, IF YOU HAVE A “GUT FEELING” THAT YOUR CHILD IS SERIOUSLY ILL; YOU SHOULD CONTACT YOUR DOCTOR RIGHT AWAY

What I did during her fever days:

  • Water therapy when there is temperature. For 30 mins or so.
  • Monitor her temperature. Medicate her when it is beyond or reaches 38 degrees. I realized that my thermometer usually reads a slightly lower temperature as compared to the readings in the clinic so I will medicate her when my reading is at 38 degrees.
  • Give her a gentle massage.
  • Encourage her to drink plenty of water.
  • Give her vitamin C.
  • Sing song to her.
  • Aircon and let her wear something light. Do Not wrap her up as it will make her temperature worse!
  • Hmmmm… any other tips?!  Please leave a comment!
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